1.  Scriptures in which the Kingdom of God is compared to a Grain of Mustard seed
In the previous post, I wrote that “The “Kingdom Of God” And “Kingdom Of Heaven” Are Used Interchangeably In Scripture.”   As I wrote, the texts highlighted the Lord Jesus’ teachings in which He spoke about the Kingdom of God in parables. The Lord compared the Kingdom of God to a grain of mustard seed (sinapi)  in one of these parables (Table 1):
Table 1  Parables in which Lord Jesus compared the Kingdom of God to a grain of mustard seed
Another parable put he forth unto them, saying, The kingdom of heaven is like to a grain (kokkos) of mustard seed, (sinapi) which a man took, and sowed in his field:Which indeed is the least of all seeds: but when it is grown, it is the greatest among herbs, and becometh a tree, so that the birds of the air come and lodge in the branches thereofAnother parable spake he unto them; The kingdom of heaven is like unto leaven, which a woman took, and hid in three measures of meal, till the whole was leavened

All these things spake Jesus unto the multitude in parables; and without a parable spake he not unto them

That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophet, saying, I will open my mouth in parables; I will utter things which have been kept secret from the foundation of the world.

Matthew 13: 31 – 35

And he said, Whereunto shall we liken the kingdom of God? or with what comparison shall we compare it?It is like a grain (kokkos) of mustard seed (sinapi), which, when it is sown in the earth, is less than all the seeds that be in the earthBut when it is sown, it groweth up, and becometh greater than all herbs, and shooteth out great branches; so that the fowls of the air may lodge under the shadow of it

And with many such parables spake he the word unto them, as they were able to hear it

 

But without a parable spake he not unto them: and when they were alone, he expounded all things to his disciples

(Mark 4: 30 – 34).

Then said he, Unto what is the kingdom of God like? and whereunto shall I resemble it?It is like a grain (kokkos) of mustard seed (sinapi), which a man took, and cast into his garden; and it grew, and waxed a great tree; and the fowls of the air lodged in the branches of it.And again he said, Whereunto shall I liken the kingdom of God?

 

It is like leaven, which a woman took and hid in three measures of meal, till the whole was leavened

(Luke 13: 18 – 21)

 
2.  In the parable, Jesus described the mustard seed as a grain (kokkos/G2848), a dual reference to its size and phenotype (physical appearance and biochemical characteristic). 

First, based on the usage of  kokkos, the Greek word for  grain ,  we see that grain refers to seeds that are small in size. I believe that  Jesus referred to size because mustard seeds “are very small… about 2 mm in diameter”  (Agricultural Products India 2014).  Apostle Paul’s reference to “…other grain” could also refer  to barley or corn, which were also small:

  • grain G2848 of mustard seed –  five times.
  • corn G2848 of wheat – John 12: 24.
  • bare grainG2848 it may chance of wheat, or of some other grain – 1 Corinthians 15: 37.
Secondly, the idea of the grain of the mustard seed as a phenotype was said to me by the Father as I studied.  A word search on “seed” reveals that humans were referred to as “seed” in the texts of scripture.  Apostle Paul appeared to continue this imagery when he   compared the dead body of the saint to a seed planted in the ground (1 Corinthians 15).
In his discourse, the Apostle spoke about Christ being the first fruits of  the resurrected dead (1 Corinthians 15: 20), then continued to teach the believers that each dead believer will be raised “in his own order (1 Corinthians 15: 23).   Order or tagma comes from a root word which means appointed, ordained, determined. In other words, God has appointed a form which will be given to the resurrected dead body of each saint, just like Christ received a spiritual body or form after His resurrection.
As Apostle Paul continued the teaching, he addressed this question,  “but someone may ask, “How will the dead be raised? What kind of bodies will they have?”  (1 Corinthians 15: 35).  He answered with the explanation that resurrection is preceded by death.
Apostle Paul further emphasized the mortal body that is buried in the ground like a seed is not the body that will be resurrected. The body that dies is like a grain of wheat or some other kind of grain and it is appointed to be raised with a form appointed by God.
This is the phenotype of the resurrected body. Each resurrected saint has already been assigned a unique and different  form that is celestial, incorruptible, powerful, spiritual, heavenly and immortal:
 “but someone may ask, “How will the dead be raised? What kind of bodies will they have?”  (NLT)
What a foolish question! When you put a seed into the ground, it doesn’t grow into a plant unless it dies first. (NLT)
And what you put in the ground is not the plant that will grow, but only a bare seed of wheat or whatever you are planting (NLT)
And what you sow is not the body that is to be, but a bare kernel, perhaps of wheat or of some other grain (ESV)
3.  Phenotypes of mustard seeds in the parable of  the mustard seed
In the same way that there are different kinds of resurrected bodies, there are also different types of grains in each seed family.  Jesus appeared to have referred to either one or more types of  mustard seeds in the parable. This appears in the variations of  the language used  by the writers when they recorded the parable. For example, both Apostles Matthew said that the mustard seed becomes a herb then a tree, Apostle Mark said that it shoots out “great branches,”  while Apostle Luke only said that the mustard seed becomes a great tree (Table 2).
The word herbs (G3001/lachanon) occurs only four times in the King James Version, has no root word and is interpreted by Strongs to mean garden herbs, which we know to be small plants. Both Apostles Matthew and Mark appear to say that the herb becomes a tree which shoot out great branches.  Can a herb become a great tree with great branches?
Table 2 Comparisons between the language of the writers on the nature of the mustard seed
.. it is the greatest among herbs (G3001/lachanon), and becometh a tree
Which indeed is the least of all seeds: but when it is grown, it is the greatest among herbs (G3001/lachanon), and becometh a tree (G1186/dendron), so that the birds of the air come and lodge in the branches thereofApostle Matthew
… is less than all the seeds that be in the earth, but when it is sown, it groweth up, and becometh greater than all herbs  (G3001/lachanon), and shooteth out great branches  Apostle Mark grain of mustard seed, which a man took, and cast into his garden; and it grew, and waxed a great tree (G1186/dendron)Apostle Luke
4.  Mustard as a herb and a tree – the potential explosive growth of  the Kingdom of God in the Earth
Mustard is classified as a “herbaceous annual,” hence the reference to it being a herb in the texts.   Although a herb, the plant can grow into  a tall tree IF CONDITIONS ARE FAVORABLE (fertile soil, sunlight and rain).  The mustard plant seedlings quickly emerge and sprout four to five weeks after planting, while the flowers appear 7 – 10 days after sprouting. The roots grow about 5 feet below the soil to store water and provide moisture to the plant.
Did the Jesus refer to the Black Mustard (Brassica nigra) when He spoke of the small seed becoming a huge tree?  This species of the mustard plant either grew wild or was cultivated in Israel. When conditions were favorable, the plant would grow to height of more than six feet, so that a man could climb it.  The seed is very small, about 1 –1.6 mm and was used to indicate the smallest measure of size.  (Jewish Virtual Library 2014).
Jesus may have referred to the common Egyptian or White Mustard (Sinapis Alba) since the word “seed” was rendered as sinapi in the Greek. The white mustard grows up to 30 in, although the  seed is larger than the black variety.
While mustard species in some parts of Europe and North America do not grow to more than 4 feet high, species in Egypt and Israel can exceed 8 – 10 feet (Israel Photos).  
I hereby record that it is prophetically significant that the mustard tree varieties in Israel grow from a tiny seed to tall heights (in comparison to other parts of the world).
Mustard seeds are powerful anti-microbial agents. They are rich in Isothiocyanates (anti cancer), selenium, omega-3 fatty acids, calcium, zinc, manganese, magnesium, protein, niacin and dietary fiber  (Agricultural Products India 2014)The Kingdom of God, like the mustard seed, exerts a healthy and protective influence in the lives and nations of those who subscribe to and live according to its teachings
Like the mustard seed, the Kingdom of God started on a small-scale, introduced by John the Baptist and preached by the Lord  Jesus.
The Kingdom of God experienced rapid growth in the early era, but suffered suppression by anti – God aka anti – Christ human political and religious kingdoms throughout ages of time and in this era.
Whenever, it is cultivated and received, the Kingdom of God becomes a great political, moral, spiritual and social influence in the earth and causes nations to be blessed, healed and protected.

Blessings, peace, angelic protection and prosperity.

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